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. >> host: as kenneth davis alluded to, the reason he is in new york and booktv is back here in washington, dc is because of sandy. we had some studio issues, so a little patched together for this "in depth." mr. davis, your most recent "don't know much about" book is don't know much about the american presidents. you talk about a couple of elections. i want to look at the election of 1800 and then the election of james k. polk versus henry clay, and you talk about how vicious they were. is today's election, the turn one we're in, vicious compared to the ones we talk about? >> guest: actually, no. it's probably more gentle by comparison if you look another some of the things said. for instance, going back even further to 1796, the first contested election, when john adams and thomas jefferson, the compatriots 20 years earlier who combined to bring the declaration of independence into being were now fierce political rivals. they maintained a friendship of sorts as jefferson served as adams' vice president, which was the result of the way presidents and vice presidents were elected back then
citiesover counties named after him without creeder creek. the circle in washington depicts sheraton of the touring war house. in the act of realing his army at -- and no command the new army of the shenandoah. sheraton's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5", and only 115 pounds in 1864. but it's grant memorable replied to one officer who commented on sheraton diminutive statute, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheraton's appointment, confederate general and 14,000 troops had marched down the shenandoah valley across the plateau mick to washington. it was a shock. capital was thrown to a panic. grant rushed troops to the city from his army outside peter berg and early withdrawal. they merged four military department with the new one with sheraton in charge of it. he was ordered to pursue army to the death and to destroy the shenandoah valley grain, produce, and livestock. on september 19, he attacked the army and defeated it at the third battle of winchester. three days later, sheraton's army followed up wi
to washington as the nation's candidate for u.s. senate, goes to washington, already six feet tall, at the front of the line when they go to the white house and kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton looks forward and gets his picture taken a long side of john f. kennedy. he is so proud and he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. by the age of 17 he is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about. he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. egos to georgetown. from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for rhodes scholarship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother direct him to who are the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that is where his i has been. until he goes back to yale law
four words. but not these first four words. so, i'll quote. i it was so disturbing so washington, i had to put the book down. addressed to a woman i can only assume is grunwalds wife, it reads to christina, my stimulus. this twit was trashing my dedication page. and i don't think the terrorists who are trying to kill salomon rushdie ever trashed his dedication page. so washington, said this kid who lives in washington. i woman i can only assume is grunwalds wife. i can only assume you're single, dude. he says, if christina really is his stimulus, does that mean she kept him from collapsing into an unprecedented depression? if we accept the definition of stimulus as something that rouses or incites to activity, the note comes across as a strangely explicit display of wonky ribaldry. come visit us in south beach, kid. we'll show you something. my stimulus is here tonight -- wait, where -- there she is, and christina did prevent me from collapsing into a depression. anybody who has ever written a book can empathize with. she most definitely rouses to activity. and it's like, change that di
-- controversial thing. american politicians were enthusiastic about this. news gets to washington, and the senate starts to debate whether the ratification of the treaty, and the only major obstacle to the purchase then arises is that jefferson, himself, strict views of the power of the federal government led him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire territory, and he starts to hem and haw and say what we need is a constitutional amendment to give the government this power. now, napolian in france overthrew his government. he was not likely would be impressed by the argument. he makes noises saying, look, i'll just revoke the treaty. it's not been ratified yet. madison, our baseline alternative, comes to jefferson -- >> host: the secretary of state. >> guest: right, in the room for every negotiation. madison comes to jefferson, you can't do this anymore. you have to agree. you have to yield. it's too big an opportunity to let your strict view of the federal government hold sway. he backs down. they go. they make the purchase. that's fine. the way this story goes
washington had to iranians. the same two the united states military stuck around to help train. >>host: first, was there any resentment on the countries where they talk about to damage their affairs or monitor hours? was there a resentment? >> that is a complicated question. in a period of 1968 and the british manage their withdrawal, many arab emirates announced they were happy to see the british leave. and did a guy is of the persian gulf they profess they did not want the united states to replace them. in private the era of small emirates along the coast were petrified. 150 years they had enjoyed a certain degree of british protection and those and their leaders made offers to both london and washington to offer financial incentives for the british and americans to stay. they were afraid of the giant neighbor to the north north, i ran that since world war ii had been attempting to reassert the influence that they had enjoyed in previous centuries and fearful of their own neighbors. many arab states harbored border disputes some claim the territory some claiming the island's in between. so
the pundits are saying in washington but what people back home are thinking about the future and what this election means. so jim, you're going to get the last word. >> thank you. in terms of consensus, i do agree with, i guess stan also the immigration is something there will be some forward progress on. i also agree with stan on the health insurance issue is probably some of plato. i was struck when the shootings happened in aurora, colorado, over the summer, that is exactly the demographic of people who don't have health insurance, young working-class kind of people. and the hospitals all said of course we will pay for all their bills and stuff. we will find the money from somewhere through some mechanism, come may. we always have. entrance a prediction, again i'm a little bit and -- i met with the doctor this money at an age. there's a congressman named rob andrews is a democrat of new jersey, 11 terms, a fairly secret guy, democratic conference, who had an article in "the wall street journal" inception in what she calls for an effort on medicine. he said specifically we should be
, a junior at american region, gets nominated to go to washington as a quote, unquote nation candidate for u.s. senate. goes to washington. he's 36 feet tall. he strives to the front of the line when they go to the white house to see president kennedy kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton looks voting gets his picture taken with alongside of john f. kennedy. he so proud and he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who will bring complete honor to the family. he already by the age of 17 is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. he goes to georgetown. from georgetown to becomes the arkansas candidate and then goes to oxford. he's an incredible success everywhere, but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he's attracted to the kind of women as mother directs in two, the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are att
. >> from the 12th annual national book festival in washington d.c., sally bedell smith presents her book, "elizabeth the queen: the life of a modern monarch." db is about 40 minutes.terri inn [applause] >> thank you so much, francis said that generous introductione i'm especially to be her today because our friendship goes bacto the990s hen honored the founding editor of the library of congress and it was his highly capable deputy editor. it fell victim to the first wave loss of funding, but this has gone on to be the top editor of the "washington post." as i have been traveling around the country, the one consistent question that i have heard is what did you learn that surprised you. >> the answer is that there was something unexpected around almost every corner. in my research, i made numerous discoveries about the way the queen goes about her job and about aspects of her character that people don't know about or don't fully appreciate. one of my main goals in writing elizabeth the queen was to part the curtain and tell what she was really like, taking the reader as close as possible t
without cedar creek. a statue in sheridan circle in washington depicts sheridan on his towering warhorse in the act of rowling his army at cedar creek. green with age, a statute conveys sheridan's electric energy. lincoln and more secretary ever stand had thought of the 33 year-old sheridan too young when grant proposed in july 1864 that he command the new army of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grant memorably replied to one officer commented on sheridan's diminutive stature, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheridan's appointment, confederate general early and 14,000 troops have marched down the shenandoah valley, across the potomac at threatened washington, the tremendous shock, the capital was thrown into a panic, grant rushed troops to the city from his army outside petersburg, and early withdrew. to prevent a recurrence, the lincoln administration merged for military departments into a new one, with sheridan in charge of it. he was ordered
online at booktv.org. >> from the 12th annual national book festival on the national mall in washington, d.c., sally bedell smith presents her book, "elizabeth the queen: the life of a modern monarch." it's about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you so much, francis, if that generous introduction. i have to tell you that i'm especially honored to be introduced by francis today because our friendship goes back to the mid 1990s when my husband, stephen, was the founding editor of civilization, the wonderful magazine of the library of congress, and francis was his highly capable deputy editor. the magazine, unfortunately, fell victim to the first wave of infatuation with the internetedt and lost its funding, but francis has gone on to be a top editor at "the washington post.n as i've been traveling arounds the country talking about queenn elizabeth ii, the one consistent question that i have heard is what did you learn thati surprised you. at did you learn t surprised you. >> the answer is that there was something unexpected around almost every corner. in my research, i made numerous discov
and washington is because of sandy. we had studio issuescome the sore little patch together for this "in depth" with kenneth davis. your most recent "don't know much about the american presidents" is about the american president and you talk about a couple elections. i went to took about 1800 the election of james k. polk versus henry clay. you compare those talking about how vicious they were. is today's election, the current fund we are red, vicious compared to the ones we just talked about? >> guest: no, it's probably more general and person if you look at some of the things said. for instance, going back further to 1796, the first contested election when john adams in thomas jefferson, that the teacher is 20 years earlier, who had combined to really bring the declaration of independence into being were now fierce political rivals. they had maintained a friendship of sorts as jefferson served as vice president, with the result affiliate presidents and vice presidents elected back then, something that changed soon after. jefferson and adams had begun to form what were the beginnings of the t
brought our focus of north dakota together to move in that direction. our challenge in washington is when the president says all of the of, he means nothing from below. 85% of our energy in america comes from coal, oil and gas. are gasoline prices have doubled over the last four years. you talk about tough times for the middle-class. in america couple of things have happened. the median income has gone from 54,000 to 50,000. the price of gas has gone up -- in health care and health insurance has gone up $2500. these are problems. we passed bipartisan bills to move energy forward but the regulatory environment and again i go back to harry reid who controls what is voted on in the senate, has said i hate oil. oil and coal are making us sick and they are harming america. my opponent says she is from north dakota and she is pledged her support to harry reid. heitkamp: as much as congressman berg would like harry reid to be standing up here don't think that's happening anytime soon so i would like to talk about my reg and who i am and what i have done. >> moderator: and i remind the audience t
with the speaker. >> well, a washington lifer and thus was not the obvious choice to be leading this tea party class. nonetheless, he could see the tea party phenomenon for the freight train that it was an elected to be on the train rather than to be underneath it. and so, you know, the speaker campaigned heavily for a number of the two-party freshman, and he also, you know, believe that is presented the republicans and indeed america with a great opportunity. his belief, for example, was that this would be a perfect recipe for entitlement reform. he wanted, if you're going after in selma reform, you want ideally to have, you know, bipartisanship and pieces of the democratic presidents of the they could not walk away from it. and so he believe that he could leverage, you know, the deep conservatism of the two-party into action, but he has failed to do so. and the tea party freshmen with whom i spent a great deal of time, and i have spent time with an awful lot of them, you know, like him personally, found an admirable in the way of a genial ceo, but certainly not as their real leader. and that
to get done and have wanted to get done since mr. smith went to washington in the thirties. and let's put them into bills and let's vote almost directly for those bills and bypass the whole political stuff than we will have things like campaign spending limits and things like most of these people have talked about. we want to get this done. how are you going to do it for domestic converse? with a congress that the bodies people's votes and actually has the gall to stand here and be proud of the fact that they brought all of this money to vermont when we are 16 trillion in debt that's 15 the house and offers a head and then he has the gall to talk about how she will have the people of fixed-income debt $6.9 million in $45 apiece donations where guess where they come from, not vermont, 9% of that money came from vermont and came from people on fixed incomes all over the country. what are you going to do with 6.9 million when he is a sure win to win is beyond me. this is the kind of thing that this vote could -- the u.s. constitution amendment attacked and salt in words you can read body goi
leave a legacy to the nation. the list of those in the second term and would george washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, rall reagan and bill clinton. lincoln has a special case in the successful second term. it's interesting to note that only the president had a more successful second term than the first or james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president elected to the second term and the reason for those are the trouble second term. member for field because of the war that seemed on winnable or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also failed because of economic crisis or the failure to act to detour such a crisis and these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt with a 37 downturn and george bush to eight failed due to their inability to leave with jefferson, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. they failed to to franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four of them did not effectively communicate this agenda or initiative were jefferson, monroe, g
the vote. he says, what if somebody who really doesn't like washington, like maybe their son got overlooked for promotion or some thing. washington had dirty anointed items as a vice presidential possibility. they say what if everybody votes for adam, but a few disgruntled souls strawberry vote from washington, what will happen? atoms will sneak through the presidency. so he writes letters to people in six of the 11 state. we need to throw with seven or eight those for adam. to insure against this possible. not isn't he the guy who said there's no intrigue and somehow it is secure. how could they deluded themselves to doing not? look, they're tired and want to move on, not the intuitive definition is like in entries like people whispering in the corridors of european courts and they don't even entertain the notion that entry can happen through the mail over a period of time and political interests might develop some people might focus around one candidate or another. this just doesn't occur to them or at least they don't ask the hard questions. so anyway, meanwhile the presidency is now the
or is this not a party related issue? >> guest: there's one party in washington and the state cap will come of the party money. frankly if you are ever elected to congress, we have to behave like every member of congress says because they want to get reelected, which means that to listen to people who provide money to pay for campaigns restaurant office and it's not going to be mary smith. it's going to be representatives of big corporations and wealthy individuals who just a little change here to be fair. but they want to do is on level the playing field and support the readers of the market. either way, there's no such thing as deregulation. there's only reregulation. only new regulation. i'm not going to defend every regulation code that looks at the interest of the company and customers and other parties in the place with the system that takes the consumer price. baseball regulations and everything is regulated and most of the regulations and federal code of regulations in the state were sought by corporations, business regulation of the defined playing field to prevent competitors and escape reader
party in washington, the party of money. and frankly, if you or i were elected to congress, we'd have to behave like every member of congress does if we want to get reelected, which means we have to his top the people who provide the money for the campaigns for us to run to office, and it's not just joe six pack and mary smith. it's representatives of big corporations and wealthy individuals who come pleading, i just need a little change here to be fair. but they really want to unlevel the playing field and thwart the rigors of the market. there's no such thing as deregulation. that's only new regulation, so what we have done is taken regulations -- i'm not going to defend every regulation, but we took a regulatory scheme that looked at the interests of companies and the interests of customers and other parties, and replaced it with a system of the corporations, by the corporations, that takes away consumer rights. everything is regulated. i like to say, baseball regulates right down to how many stitches on the ball and the color of yarn. everything is regulated. most of the regulatio
: there is one part in washington. it's the of money. there's one part in the state capital. it's the party of money but if you or i were elected to congress would have to be like every member cost of because if we want to get reelected which means that you listen to people who will provide the money to pay for the campaigns for us to run for office. it's not going to be joe sixpack and mary smith. it's going to be representatives of big corporations. and wealthy individuals who all, pleading, i just need a change here to be fair. what you really want to do is on level the playing field and force the rigors of the market. there's no such thing as deregulation. there is only we regulation. there so many regulation. so we've done is taken regulation -- i'm not going to defend every revelation but we took a regulatory scheme that was balanced to look at the interest of companies and look at the interests of customers and other parties, and replaced with a system of the corporations by the corporations who takes away consumer rights. everything is regulated. baseball regulates right now coming
write on plantation society missed out in his last book was on george washington and slavery, entitled, an imperfect guide, which was published in 2003. at the end of his talk, he will be taking questions and we be available to sign copies of this book in the gallery. please join me in welcoming, henry wiencek. [applause] >> thank you, andrew. i very much appreciate your remarks in his homecoming for me because i spent many months upstairs and down the hall when i had a fellowship here to begin my research on the boat. i'm extremely grateful to andrew for all the aid he has lent me in support and also to dian jordan from a former executive at her and leslie bowman, current executive dirt for their support in the past into the present. this is a magnificent resource in the standard set of monticello is perhaps the leading public history study of slavery in the united states. the study of that subject is really very difficult for a number of reasons. one is that it's so hard to get the documents in the other is a psychological impediments that we americans have that best described by the
and his last book was on george washington in slavery entitled and in perfect god which was published in 2003. at the end of his talky will be taking questions and will be available to sign copies of his book in the gallery. please join me in a welcoming henry when sec. [applause] >> thank you. a very much appreciate your remarks. it is a homecoming for me because i spent many months upstairs and down the hall when i had a here to begin my research on the book. i am extremely grateful for all of the ways he has let me support over the years and also to up the former executive director of monticello and leslie bowman, the current executive director for their support in the past and in the present. this is a magnificent resource. as andrew says, monticello is, perhaps, a leading public history site for the study of slavery in the united states. that -- the study of that subject is really very difficult for a number of reasons. one is, it's so hard to get the documents, and the other is the psychological impediments that we americans have in that, as described by one hold, the theologian
you said is a little, a little off from what we're hearing here in washington. >> guest: well, i think there's definitely, um, opinion a big focus -- been a big focus on wireless and what the capability is. we're out there in the world today and understand the spectrum limitations are real, um, engineers will tell you about that, that it just can't deliver the kind of bandwidth that we need to really accomplish the goals that businesses and consumers want in their homes. and so what we're trying to do at the usta is constantly remind people that without the wired network, you're not going to have the wireless network. and so, um, the policymakers, i think, understand it better than ever, that, um, you need fiber facilities into these cell towers in order to enable them to carry broadband at faster and faster speeds, and you need better and better, um, access to broadband capabilities in the home. >> host: jeff gardner is president and ceo of the windstream corporation, and he this year is chairman of the group us telecom. paul barbagallo is with bloomberg. >> so we talked about univers
in our washington studio is paul barbagallo of bloomberg. professor noll, first of all, what was your role or activity during the breakup of at&t, and what led to that decision? >> guest: well, the roots of the antitrust case were in a presidential task force that was formed during the johnson administration in the late 1960s called the telecommunications policy task force. it had concluded that the telecommunications industry, at least the part of it that was in the federal jurisdiction, could be competitive and made recommendations both to the -- mainly to the federal communications commission about how to cause that to happen. then when the nixon administration came along, the holdover staff in the antitrust division after watching for a couple of years decided to pursue antitrust rather than fcc regulation as the means to introduce competition. my role was that i was on both the telecommunications policy task force, and i was one of the outside economists advising the department of justice during the mid '70s when the case was actually being shaped. >> host: and professor hausman?
of those who prevailed in their second term includes george washington, james madison, and rejection, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln is a special case and that his successful second term was so brief. it is interesting to note-only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first word james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president's elected to a second term and the reason for those of experience failed or troubled second terms. four failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable war for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and. were the four. also four failed because of economic crisis or failure to act to deter such a crisis. jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt, the 37 downturn and george bush. eight who failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grant, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and george bush. two failed due to who boris. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiat
to be a separate business. there are always people arguing in washington. but if you actually look, the latest government statistics are 32% of the people don't even have landline telephones anymore. they use cell phones. the competition out there, in terms of the internet. 4-g is coming in. i would be willing to predict that in 10 or 15 years, the majority of youth on the internet will be over mobile phones and cell phones throughout the world. >> host: if you expand that to wireless devices so you don't limit it to cell phones -- >> guest: that's what i mean. tablets, you name it, exactly. >> host: i think the really important point about your question is that the mindset of the world well into the mid-1990s was that wireline access was stuck on poles or buried in the ground was the key to understanding competition in telecommunications. the intriguing part of the wireless story is how very few people inside the industry -- that that is why the mckenzie mckinsey report listed, it wasn't just judge green and the fcc who did not understand the potential of wireless. it was the entire industry,
of american power, washington had to rely on two surrogates. the saudis and the iranians. those same two countries, after world war ii, of which the united states military stuck around to help train. >> host: well, first off, professor, was there any resentment on the part of some of the countries in the middle east where we talk about taking over for the english, to manage their affairs or to monitor our affairs in the middle east? was there resentment in the persian gulf area about that? >> that's a complicated question. i would think for public consumption, in the period 1968 to 1971 when the british were managing their withdrawal, many of the arab emirates publicly pronounced they were happy to see the british leave. and under the guise of the persian gulf for the local powers, they publicly profess they didn't want the united states to replace them. in private, on the other hand, the arab small emirates along the southern coast of the gulf war petrified. for 150 years they had enjoyed a certain degree of british protection, and the small emirates and their leaders in diplomatic gath
-- the teachers including is a great one. the schools in washington, very successful about turning around inner city kids, and the kids in that school have to carry a book at all times. it's neat. funny you mention that. i did a reading at my home town, and my 2nd grade teacher was there. she's like 92 years old. i was signing books, and she said, james, your handwriting is still atrocious. [laughter] >> that's great. talk a little bit about where you see our culture going. you're doing -- >> oh, my god. >> i don't mean in general, but in terms of reading. are we creating a culture of readers, notary -- non-readers, where are we now? >> i think the worst thing that's happening is we're creating a culture where people don't listen. they don't listen to the other side. there's a quote -- i read an editorial in the "new york times" a couple weeks ago, and it had to do with morality's ability to behind -- bind and blind, and, you know, it binds people, you believe in, you know, you believe in whatever you believe in, abortion one way or the other or whatever you believe about entitlements or whatev
. people care and increasingly so and so this morning "the washington post" has convened a stellar group of cyber experts to highlight the issue. the vulnerability is out there with a whole game of talking about stronger defense. let me welcome now a person steeped in cyber, a member of president obama's gemmer circle, psychiatry homeland security janet napolitano. [applause] she's going to give a few remarks of the podium and then we are going to sit down for discussion and welcome your questions as well. and along with running americas homeland security department come and the whole range of responsibilities from terrorism to natural disasters, and i just always loved to mention this that before coming to washington, she of course was the governor of arizona. she chaired the national governors' association, and she was the very first female valedictorian at the university before she got her doctorate. i love that. miss napolitano. >> good morning everybody. i thought i would do is give you a little update on the storm in part because as mentioned, disaster response is one of the key el
] they take on many institutions in washington and elsewhere and let me talk for a minute about some of the things they say about the news media which is appropriate to criticize there is a lot to criticize about how we do our jobs and how we ought to do them better and they talk about fact czech institutions, that's something that journalism is doing more things like truth telling on tv ads and a lot of organizations including my own is trying to do this year. i think there's been some move in the last few years to do what you just talk about which is someone says something is black and someone says it's white and you can tell it's white you shouldn't just say he says it's white and he says it's black. the two things i think the specific story lines that have pushed journalism to be more willing to call someone as saying the truth or not is the whole movement because we found early on in the obama campaign for years ago that it wasn't enough to say this voter i interviewed said that he was born in kenya and obama denies being born in kenya. that didn't tell the readers enough what t
in the south, and who last book on george washington and slavery entitled "an imperfect god" which was published in 2003. at the end of his talk, he will be taking questions, and will be available to sign copies of his book in the gallery. employees join me in welcoming henry weincek. [applause] thank you. i appreciate your remarks, it's a home coming for me. i spent many months downstairs and down the hall when had a fellowship to begin my research on the book. and i'm extremely grateful to personally for all the aid he lent know support over the years and also to the former executive directer of month cello and the current executive directer for their support in the past and present. this is a great resource and as andrew says month cello is the leading -- the study of the subject is really very difficult for a number of republicans. it's hard to get out the documents. and the other is the psychology immedment that the americans have and as described by the though lodge began who happens to be the father of my editor, he says american americans by ultra additions are the most inn
fragile and economic recovery. in washington all they've been having is an election. and if any business was facing the equivalent of a $7.2 trillion hit and it's got and that's what we have over the next decade that is what the economic effect of this will become the expiration of the bush tax cut, the expiration of a payroll tax and the patch that is put in order so that i won't hit the middle class expiration of the unemployment benefits, the sequester which is the senseless across-the-board cuts that came about because of the failure of the super committee. and no business tries to balance their books doing across-the-board. you go in there surgically and try to do the things that have the lease adverse effect on the productivity. so today we have about 48 days left we just went through this election. isn't it amazing that during the election and all four of the debates toward fiscal clift was never, ever mentioned, not by the reporters and not by the candidates. islamic no mention of the solvency of social security for 75 years or what to do with medicare which is on an unsustainabl
and chancellor of the new york city public schools joel kline had a somewhat on education reform in washington examining america's education system and the impact on national security. council on foreign relations moderates the discussion, about an hour. >> welcome to this evening, broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament to two things. one is how the education reform has ripened, a combination of meade, the talent we see in this room has coalesced on the issue of new technologies but there is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i am a great believer that two things matter in life. won his ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change, the real driver of history. when you unpack it all and jeb bush is a perfect example. the coming together of a person with real talent and drive with a set of ideas and this is one of them. the fact that you are all here is the greatest salute you could give. condoleezza rice and i come out of a national security background. we use to mess around with something called the ra
into this race for the united states senate because like so many north dakota tans, i believe washington, d.c. was absolutely broken. it seemed like the politicians in that town believed that what was most important was their political party, what they believed was most important was their own private interests and the special interests. and somehow the interest of the people was left behind. and we needed change. two years ago congressman berg said he could go to washington, d.c. and end the gridlock and take away the partisanship and start solving problems. but when congressman berg got to washington, d.c., he voted 100% with his own political party. and i believe he voted against north dakota's interest. he voted for plan that cut $180 billion out of the farm bill including a 20% reduction in crop insurance. he voted for a plan that was, in fact, a plan that privatized and made our social security and our, um, medicare a private system. and i believe a lot of those votes did not reflect our values, and that's what got me in this race. >> moderator: thank you. representative berg, you may
that got us into that mess, sending one of them to washington dc. >> moderator: thank you. king: olympia snowe left because she wanted to spend more time with her family, she left because she said the place and in function and she couldn't get anything done. she was utterly frustrated. i believe that we have to try to do something different in order to respond to that challenge, and that's why i am running for the united states senate as an independent. this makes a real difference in peoples people's lives. this isn't about processes. this is about solving the problems that the nation faces. for example, there was a bill before the senate that would have benefited veterans across the country and it was filibustered because the party in the senate -- they didn't want the president have a victory before the election. that is a terrible way to make decisions. the concern should have been for the veterans and not for the politics. >> moderator: thank you. summers: we are spending a trillion dollars a year year more than we take in and that is simply unsustainable. i want to go to washington
how to manipulate the levers of power in washington. he understood human nature, understood the strength and weaknesses of the people in congress and how to play on those weaknesses and strengths. obama doesn't have that skill set to use human nature as a way of getting done what he wants to get done in washington. >> host: holm books have you written? >> guest: i think this is my 11th book. three novels and eight nonfiction. >> host: what do you say to critics of your books? >> guest: what do the critics say. >> host: the accuracy of the stories you tell, et cetera. >> guest: well, the fact of the matter is, as far as i know, there hasn't been a single fact in this book that's been challenged in a kind of credible way. people have said, oh, klein makes things up. that's what kids in the schoolyard -- they call each other names. i've been called all kinds of names. but in fact when it comes to the credibility of my reporting, i don't think anybody has laid a glove on me yet. >> host: how many university were you editor. >> guest: 12 years assed debtor in chief of "new york t
. the terms by which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have been the focus of intense debate but the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, senior fellow and speaker this afternoon focuses in her timely and important new book "regulating to disaster: how green jobs policies are damaging america's economy". in it, she subjects assumptions and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a 123 caller battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect of the oxford trained economist whose chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book she helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both significant problems in themselves and cautionary tale for those who would have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication of "regulating to disaster" calfs diana's first year as
, not far from washington, and it is extraordinary how much people don't know. you know, just by virtue of being young. how would they know? they didn't grow up with parents who fought in world war ii. i explained how my uncle was thinking about whether he would be drafted ape had what we called a low draft number of the i thought, they don't know what i'm talking about. a low draft number -- draft doesn't mean much of anything anymore either. it's an interesting problem. it really is. >> i think it would be fascinating to think in terms of what is war? i mean, we've had war for ten years now, another war. they had war, but this war, no one's participated in other than certain percentage. it's out there. >> yeah. it's changed, hasn't it? >> yes, it has. >> and not -- it's not an obligation of citizenship anymore to fight for your country when it's at war. it's something that the professional military does. i think that's a profound change that's taken place. because of that richard nixon in 197 p 3, and, also, because of my generation, they wanted to put an end to the draft. >> [inaudib
a man named almond babbitt who was a lawyer and church member that the mormons had sent to washington as their delegate to congress. brigham young was, to put it mildly, not very happy with either babbitt or the federal appointees. he did not want non-mormons to interfere with the church's control of utah's politics. also, he had heard all sorts of negative reports about babbitt's activities in washington. babbitt had drank too much and had cozied up to politicians, hoping to get a territorial appointment for himself, all sorts of things. shortly after babbitt returned to utah, young summoned him to his office at 8:00 in the morning. yong rarely started the day so early. he liked to go to bed late and get up late and i think because of that he may have been in an especially cantankerous mood for the meeting. babbitt again by reporting to president fillmore hopes that you would not mingle your religion with your public duties. the president worries that young would be as a prince of this world and it prophet for the next. babbitt and young then argued over a few things. federal appropr
your cia background. >> i worked at cia and nationalp intelligence counsel inac washington for about thirty fivl years.in >> what capacity? >> i became the national intelligence officer for latinee america which it a three or foua star military equivalent.on he was a civilian. it was a substantial position. i had responsibility for all of latin america and cuba. on the an lettic side oft -- intelligence. >> what does thatno mean? >> i was not a field operative. i did not go and conductof espionage. i did not go out and be foreignl agency. most of my career at headquarter mainly virginia. i wrote national intelligencean estimates. quite a few on cuba over the >> b years, and on many of the other ca latin american countries. how >> before we get to castro and the castro regime. at how did you get interested in the work? >> i was student at georgetownes university where i later taughte for about twenty five years as , an adjunct i'm teaching now atgo the university of miami. i was attracted to the foreigner service school at georgetown. it was a timeja when a lot of us of my generation
in washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid of fannie mae and the retribution it meted out to people who dare to cross it. hubris, fanning a often claiming it was the center of quote the best housing finance system in the world of quote so ironically in retrospect of course. this sentiment being echoed by former senator and banking committee chairman dodd explaining that fannie was quote one of the great success stories of all times unquote and so it was until the fall it's humiliation. all five acts are very well kwon are called by bob's book. but which shakespearean tragedy is this in the background behind the history of fannie mae? thinking of the fear of fannie, perhaps it's richard iii with fannie as the ruthless richard brought down finally upon the field of bosworth by henry paulsen playing henry vii. , a thinking of ben fannie's ceo as presented in the book, pathetically presenting financial plans to a treasury department which had already decided upon and was indeed scheduling his fate. is it the great pathos full abdication sce
. douglas was reluctant but 1870 that brought in from is frederick douglass and washington because with him involved in local politics with the modern republican of party you was very much the republican party man. washington d.c. got self-government and was the first non-voting delegates to see that position he then continued as president of the friedman bank. he moved his family here. it has been many issues but we've learned about him but to go as the abolition does but later in life he has been ignored. spending time in washington and i started to look into his later life and there wasn't much written but it is a great opportunity. >> from the 1960's jfk signed but federal douglas historic site open to. with the national park service there is about 40,000 visitors every year. and high on the hill you can see the washington monument to the left and the u.s. capitol dome to the right. it is a majestic view and open seven days a week. >> soapy quote would read the book 1/2 not then there but to revisit. >> laraque reader at the douglas house, . >> the current curator he is a retired now bu
] on power, many people in washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid for fannie mae and the restoration of weeded out to people who dare to cross it. i hubris we had seen it often claiming it was the center of the best housing finance system in the world, unquote. every so ironically in retrospect of course. this sentiment being echoed by former senator and banking committee chairman dodd, exclaiming cne was one of the great success stories of all time, unquote. and so it was until the humiliation. all five acts are very well chronicled by bob spoke, but which shakespearean tragedy is this in the background behind the history of fannie mae? thinking of the fear of cne, perhaps it is richard the third, with danny is the ruthless richard brecht and finally on the field of buzzwords by henry paulson plan henry the seventh. or thinking of then fannie ceo is presented in the book, pathetically presenting financial plans to a treasury department, which had already decided to bond and was indeed scheduling his feet. is it the great pathos fu
awake to brush this aside much the way george washington brushed aside his own complaint of subordinates in the revolution only key moments he put his foot down and essentially told the brakes to stuff it. that didn't stop from becoming a thorn in the sight of all american commanders in europe for the duration of the war. but ike, omar bradley, george patton on managed workarounds to minimize the negative in fact of the war effort. so when the war in, we are expected to supply wealth and prosperity to all be due to the best of our ability and yet this brings with it this irony that by supplying wells and protection, you are eroding the very disciplines necessary to maintain and perpetuate prosperity for yourself and prosperity and freedom for others. therapeutic challenge of the next 75 years in the topic of volume two. how to provide a canopy of liberty and perpetuate american exceptionalism while allowing just enough of the rain of difficulty and disappointment to remind american and the world that the era in which we have all been blessed with no golden accident. [applause] >> will ac
officials that we'll see quoted in the "washington post" or "the new york times." those are an effort to kill 10 to 15 individuals with the u.s. police plot against the u.s. so one of two things is true. neutron strikes aren't as accurate as we all told they are or the u.s. is doing something different than what it says it is doing, targeting more than just a 10 to 15 individuals. so what would any initiation and be able to do if al qaeda were to carry out an attack today? if a large-scale ground invasion is foolish in the disaster is and is really table, do they just have another missile search, which referred the same, which doesn't seem to be effective. this is the critique of the jenin battle that has been designed by individuals within the upon the administrator is not dismantling and defeating al qaeda. in yemen, was happening on the ground if al qaeda is expanding and the problem is exacerbated. so while ibrahim finished an optimistic note, although i fell back to earth with a rather pessimistic one. >> thank you, both. before it up into crushing sunni audience, what is to have
the issues. again this going to tell a story. before i do that, because i am from washington and because it's halloween and because i have three children, all of some of the church retreat to my will report year that the most popular cost and that is completely is binder full of women. >> what did the selling custom look like? you put your arms in the binder. it's like not at jack in the box . pops out of a little fuller think. said we were bell in washington. very creative. i'm just going to tell the story that inspired me to read my book. this began in 2009. the book is based on an atlanta store which cannot in 2010. basically i have been vacationing for a long time which is a pretty prosperous working class town. when you went there. it seemed like it or not that many men around. it seemed like a was not seen them in church, at the fairgrounds, driving down the street, trucks, during construction. this is the height of the housing collapse that anyone talked about. and so men were having a lot of hard time. the loss of a lot of manufacturing jobs. and i really became curious about this.
with the the argument going in. that argument remains unsettled in washington today and that is the doubt i think you're picking up on your question. >> i'll make several comments. i'm working backwards on yours, you know, i look at it this way. the united states has the capability in this period in time, but secondly it's the united states that has taken the responsibility and step forward. i can't come to another country but to take that responsibility. david is the approaches in dealing with responsibility and more cost effective ways. having said that, i would argue there is going to be a big debate over this issue because there are many different ways of advanced team strategic interests. i flip to the first question on diplomacy development and defense. i think many of you know when certain members of congress here would get the question tears at a festival amount of foreign aid we give abroad than the fact is that under some 1%. why mention that that hence the question that investment is a form of leadership and investment in stabilizing other areas and it does matter and does fit in the diplo
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